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Teaching with Capitol Art

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A Storm Passing Northwest of Anadarko by Wilson Hurley
A Storm Passing Northwest of Anadarko is one of four paintings in Wilson Hurley's Visions of the Land: The Centennial Suite that represents the four quadrants of Oklahoma's diverse landscape.
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Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher by Mitsuno Ishii Reedy
Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher was a leading activist, attorney, and educator who opened higher education to African-American students in Oklahoma and laid the foundation for the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
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Albert Comstock Hamlin 1881-1912 by Simmie Knox
A. C. Hamlin, Republican, was the first African-American elected to the Oklahoma State Legislature. He was elected in 1908.
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As Long as the Waters Flow by Allan C Houser
As Long as the Waters Flow by Allan Houser refers to President Andrew Jackson's vow to Native Americans that they shall posses their land "as long as the grass grows and the rivers run."
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Autumn Woods North of Tahlequah by Wilson Hurley
Autumn Woods North of Tahlequah is one of four paintings in Wilson Hurley's Visions of the Land: The Centennial Suite that represents the four quadrants of Oklahoma's diverse landscape.
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Benjamin Harrison Hill 1904-1971 by Simmie Knox
Benjamin Harrison Hill, Democrat, was elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives in 1968.
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Beyond the Centennial by Carlos Tello
An extraordinary future," artist Carlos Tello has rendered an insightful, yet dynamic mural that reflects upon our distinct history, contemporary culture, and limitless future.
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Carl Albert by Charles Banks Wilson
Born in McAlester in 1908, Carl Albert was elected the 46th Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives in 1971, the highest elected office ever held by an Oklahoman.
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Creek Council Oak Tree by Mike Larsen
The traditional "ceremonial ground" under this mature post oak tree was chosen by the Lochapoka clan of the Creek Indians as the place to begin a new life.
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David L. Payne, The Original Oklahoma Boomer by Joe R. Taylor
David L. Payne is known as Oklahoma’s original boomer and has been called the father of Oklahoma for his push to settle the unassigned lands which Payne considered to be public domain.
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Discovery and Exploration, 1541 - 1820 by Charles Banks Wilson
The first of the historic murals, Discovery and Exploration depicts famed Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado atop his armored horse, the Wichita Indians, and Antelope Hills.
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Dr. Angie Debo by Charles Banks Wilson
Dr. Angie Debo was a leading scholar of Indian and Oklahoma history. Her nine books serve as a cornerstone of American Indian scholarship, and her research is frequently cited as evidence in present-day federal court cases involving tribal land rights.
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Dr. John Hope Franklin by Everett Raymond Kinstler
Franklin's prolific writing might only be outdone by his dedication to civil rights. His work From Slavery to Freedom was first published in 1947 and has sold more than three million copies worldwide.
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Edward P. McCabe, 1850-1923 by Simmie Knox
Edward P. McCabe established the City of Langston, an all black community, and the Langston Herald newspaper.
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Elk Herd in the Wichita Mountains by Barbara Vaupel
Elk Herd in the Wichita Mountains depicts Elk grazing peacefully on a stretch of grassland bordered by the rising granite mountains of Southwest Oklahoma.
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Flight of Spirit by Mike Larsen
Flight of Spirit features five world-renowned Oklahoma ballet dancers and merges the tragic history of Native Americans with the hope and renewal of modern accomplishments. Behind the illuminated ballerinas is Larsen’s depiction of the Trail of Tears.
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Frontier Trade, 1790 - 1830 by Charles Banks Wilson
The years 1790 to 1830 were marked by a rising interest in Oklahoma territory. In the mural Frontier Trade, Wilson depicts a bustling scene of rising commerce.
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Game Birds at Glass Mountain by Harold T. Holden
The Glass Mountains are located 6 miles west of Orienta, Oklahoma. The mountains have a high selenite content, making them appear as if they were covered with pieces of glass.
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Governor Brad Henry by Paul Moore
Brad Henry was officially sworn in as Oklahoma's 26th governor on January 13, 2003. Governor Henry was re-elected in 2006 by one of the largest margins in state history.
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Governor Charles Nathaniel Haskell, 1907-1911 by Leonard D McMurray
Charles Nathaniel Haskell was Oklahoma's first Governor.
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Governor David Hall, 1971-1975 by Leonard D McMurray
David Hall was inaugurated January 11, 1971, following the closest gubernatorial election in the state's history.
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Governor David Lee Walters, 1991-1995 by Harold T. Holden
On November 6, 1990, David Lee Walters was elected to serve as the 24th governor of Oklahoma and served until 1994.
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Governor David Lyle Boren, 1975-1979 by Leonard D McMurray
David Lyle Boren was elected to the House of Representatives in 1967 and served until his election as Governor in November, 1974.
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Governor Dewey Follett Bartlett, 1967-1971 by Leonard D McMurray
Dewey Follett Bartlett was first elected to the State Senate in 1962 and was reelected in 1964. He served as Governor from January 9, 1967, to January 11, 1971, and was elected to the U.S. Senate November 7, 1972.
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Governor Ernest Whitworth-Marland, 1935-1939 by Leonard D McMurray
Ernest Whitworth Marland was Governor of Oklahoma from January 15, 1935 to January 9, 1939.
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Governor Frank Keating, 1995-1999 by Jo Saylors
Francis Anthony Keating is the second Governor in Oklahoma history to hold two consecutive terms and the only Republican to accomplish that feat.
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Governor George Patterson Nigh, January 6, 1963 - January 14, 1963, January 3, 1979 - January 8, 1979 January 8, 1979 - January 15, 1982 January 15, 1982 - January 13, 1986 by Leonard D McMurray
Taking office at age 31, George Patterson Nigh became the youngest state Lieutenant Governor in the United States. In 1963, Nigh became the 17th Governor in Oklahoma, filling an unexpired 9-day term following the resignation for Gov. J. Howard Edmondson.
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Governor Henry Lewis Bellmon, 1963-1967; 1986-1990 by Leonard D McMurray
Henry Louis Bellmon was the first Republican Governor of the State of Oklahoma. He served as Governor from 1963 to 1967, and from 1986 to 1990.
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Governor Henry Simpson Johnston, 1927-1929 by Leonard D McMurray
Henry Simpson Johnston was a member and temporary presiding officer of the Constitutional Convention in 1906. He was elected Governor in 1926 and took office January 10, 1927.
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Governor Jack Callaway Walton, Jan. 8 - Nov. 19, 1923 by Leonard D McMurray
Jack Callaway Walton was elected Governor in 1922 and was impeached within the year, serving from January 8, to November 19, 1923.
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Governor James Brooks Ayers Robertson, 1919-1923 by Leonard D McMurray
James Brooks Ayers Robertson was Governor of Oklahoma, January 13, 1919 to January 8, 1923.
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Governor James Howard Edmondson, 1959-1963 by Leonard D McMurray
James Howard Edmondson was the youngest governor in the history of the state. He served as Governor from 1959 to 1963.
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Governor Johnston Murray, 1951-1955 by Leonard D McMurray
Johnston Murray served as Governor from January 8, 1951, to January 1955.
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Governor Lee Cruce, 1911-1915 by Leonard D. McMurry
Lee Cruce served as Oklahoma's second Governor from January 9, 1911, to January 11, 1915.
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Governor Leon Chase Phillips, 1939-1943 by Leonard D McMurray
Leon Chase Phillips was a member of the State Legislature from 1933 to 1938; Speaker of the House in 1935; and Governor from January 9, 1939, to January 11, 1943.
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Governor Martin Edwin Trapp, Nov. 19, 1923 - Jan. 10, 1927 by Leonard D McMurray
After the impeachment of Gov. Walton, Martin Edwin Trapp served as Governor of the State from November 19, 1923, until January 10, 1927.
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Governor Raymond Dancel Gary, 1955-1959 by Leonard D McMurray
Raymond Dancel Gary was the first Governor to be born in Oklahoma after statehood. He served as Governor from from 1955 to 1959.
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Governor Robert Lee Williams, 1915-1919 by Leonard D McMurray
Robert Lee Williams was Oklahoma's third Governor.
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Governor Robert Samuel Kerr, 1943-1947 by Leonard D McMurray
Robert Samuel Kerr was Oklahoma's first native-born governor. He served as Governor of Oklahoma from January 13, 1943, to January 13, 1947.
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Governor Roy Joseph Turner, 1947-1951 by Leonard D McMurray
Roy Joseph Turner served as Governor of Oklahoma from January 13, 1947, to January 8, 1951.
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Governor William Henry Murray, 1931-1935 by Leonard D McMurray
William Henry "Alfalfa Bill" Murray was probably Oklahoma's most colorful political figure. Murray was a member of the 63rd and 64th United States Congresses and Governor of Oklahoma from January 12, 1931, to January 15, 1935.
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Governor William Judson Holloway, 1929-1931 by Leonard D McMurray
William Judson Holloway was elected Lieutenant Governor in 1926 and advanced to the Governor's office upon the impeachment of Gov. Johnston and completed the term.
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Indian Immigration, 1820 - 1885 by Charles Banks Wilson
Indian Immigration captures the atmospheric tension and civil unrest as 67 different Native American tribes were forced into the region. Already a home for nomadic hunters, the Native American settlers would become implemental in the development of the state.
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Jim Thorpe by Charles Banks Wilson
Jacobus Franciscus "Jim" Thorpe is considered one of the most versatile athletes in modern sports. This Sac and Fox Indian from Oklahoma won Olympic gold medals in the pentathlon and decathlon and was called "the greatest athlete in the world" by Sweden's King Gustav V.
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Kate Barnard by Sandra Van Zandt
Kate Barnard was the first woman in American history elected to state office as well as Oklahoma’s first commissioner of charities and corrections.
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Miss Alice Robertson by Mike Wimmer
In 1920, Alice Mary Robertson became the second woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives when she defeated the three-term incumbent William W. Hastings, in Oklahoma's Second Congressional District.
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Mrs. Lamar Looney by Mike Wimmer
Oklahoma’s first female Senator was born Mirabeau Lamar Cole on January 16, 1871, in Alabama.
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Non-Indian Settlement, 1870 - 1906 by Charles Banks Wilson
Non-Indian Settlement illustrates the years 1870-1906 in which Unassigned Lands were open to all in the Land Run of 1889.
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Oklahoma Black Gold by Jeff Dodd
Oklahoma Black Gold by Jeff Dodd celebrates the 100th anniversary of the oil and gas industry in Oklahoma.
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President Teddy Roosevelt Signing Statehood Proclamation by Mike Wimmer
“Oklahoma is now a state,” declared Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States, as he signed the statehood proclamation at 10:16 o’clock on the morning of November 16, 1907.
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Rep. Bessie S. McColgin by Mike Wimmer
Oklahoma’s first woman to serve in the Oklahoma House of Representatives was Amelia Elizabeth “Bessie” McColgin, a Republican from Rankin in western Oklahoma. She was elected in 1920 and served in the Eighth Legislature from 1920-21.
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Robert L. Williams by Joe R. Taylor
Governor Robert L. Williams was responsible for the completion of Oklahoma’s dome-less capital and oversaw every detail. He believed the dome would be a “useless ornamentation” because he strongly wanted to stay within budget.
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Robert S. Kerr by Charles Banks Wilson
Sen. Robert S. Kerr, Oklahoma’s homespun statesman, led a career that stretched from a log cabin near Ada to national leadership and immense business success.
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Roscoe Dunjee, 1883-1965 by Simmie Knox
Oklahoma journalist and publisher Roscoe Dunjee founded the nationally known Oklahoma City Black Dispatch newspaper in 1915 and shaped American history, serving as spokesman and leader in the civil rights movement.
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Sequoyah by Charles Banks Wilson
Sequoyah is credited with the creation of the Cherokee syllabary, a group of 85 symbols used to notate the sounds of the Cherokee language.
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Showers of Sunshine by Linda Tuma Robertson
Showers of Sunshine depicts a scene from the H.E. Bailey turnpike in Grady County that was authorized by the State Legislature in 1953. The original 86.4 miles opened in 1964, and the 8.2 mile extension connecting State Highway 9 to Norman was opened in 2001.
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Spring Morning Along the Muddy Boggy by Wilson Hurley
Spring Morning Along the Muddy Boggy is one of four paintings in Wilson Hurley's Visions of the Land: The Centennial Suite that represents the four quadrants of Oklahoma's diverse landscape.
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Sunset at Roman Nose State Park by Wilson Hurley
Sunset at Roman Nose State Park is one of four paintings in Wilson Hurley's Visions of the Land: The Centennial Suite that represents the four quadrants of Oklahoma's diverse landscape.
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Tallgrass Prairie by Wayne Cooper
The tallgrass prairie was one of North America's major ecosystems originally spanning portions of 14 states and covering over 142 million acres. It was a complex landscape, harboring a rich diversity of plants and animals, that was shaped by nature.
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Te Ata by Nellie Ellen Shepherd
Te Ata (1895-1995) was a traditional Native American storyteller.
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The Earth and I Are One by Enoch Kelly Haney
The Earth and I Are One is a mystical painting of a meditating Native American sitting amongst Oklahoma’s state wildflower, the Indian blanket.
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The Guardian by Enoch Kelly Haney
The Guardian embodies the diversity within the proud and strong population of Oklahoma while serving as a reminder of our tumultuous times. It stands prominently atop the Oklahoma State Capitol dome where it was lifted on June 7, 2002.
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The Power of Hope by Enoch Kelly Haney
The Power of Hope depicts a mother and child; the mother is strong in the face of adversity. She will always protect her child and meet whatever lies ahead with dignity and determination.
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The Spirit of Heritage by Enoch Kelly Haney
The Spirit of Heritage depicts an Indian mother carrying her infant in a cradle-board. The imagery is representative of the rich culture and traditions which strengthen and enrich not just the western tribes, but all of Oklahoma.
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The Will to Live by Enoch Kelly Haney
The Will to Live depicts a young warrior, and in the background of the relief is a buffalo, a native symbol of endurance. At one time, the buffalo was nearly extinct, but ultimately not only survived, but thrived.
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Tribute To Range Riders by Constance Whitney Warren
Constance Whitney Warren’s intricately detailed sculpture of a bucking bronco and a steadfast cowboy in wool chaps was the first sculpture installed on the grounds of Oklahoma’s State Capitol.
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We Belong to the Land by Jeff Dodd
We Belong to the Land by Jeff Dodd features the contribution agriculture has made to the history of Oklahoma.
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Will Rogers by Charles Banks Wilson
Known as Oklahoma's favorite son, Will Rogers was a cowboy, vaudeville performer, humorist, social commentator, and motion picture actor. He was one of the world's best-known celebrities in the 1920s and 1930s.
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With the Vision of an Eagle by Enoch Kelly Haney
In With the Vision of an Eagle depicts a tribal leader in the foreground and a soaring eagle placed behind him at eye level. The eagle is a symbol of vision, foresight and leadership, all of which are embodied in the depiction of the tribal leader in the forefront of the relief.